The Work Hours and Duty Stations of a Border Patrol Agent

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As a BPA, you may be called on to add 9 to 10 hours for what the Customs and Border Protection calls AUO or Administratively Uncontrollable Overtime. These extra hours are for shift changes, processing of illegal aliens, and other tasks that cannot be scheduled. You can also expect to work in various times of the day or night and will be required, depending on your schedule to work weekends or holidays.The work hours of a Border Patrol Agent (BPA) is no 9 – 5!!

Of course, this isn’t unpaid work!

All border patrol agents receive an additional 25 percent over and above their base salaries.

So where can you expect to be assigned? Most of the BPAs work in duty stations found along the U.S. Southwest border with Mexico in the states of California, Arizona, New Mexico, or Texas. You may tell your superiors that you want to be stationed in a particular border region location but placements are usually made on where agents are actually needed. So get ready to make new neighbors!

Duty stations are usually found in small communities that are seemingly isolated from the rest of civilization. It is not uncommon to find poor schools and inadequate medical facilities in the area. You might need to drive long distances to get groceries at reasonable prices. Spanish is often the language used which is the reason why all new recruits are required to be able to speak it before they graduate from the Border Patrol Academy. The culture of the people in your duty post may be entirely new to you—even the food they eat and the signs you see may be different.

Of course if you’re ready for these changes, it should be all very exciting!